Wlliam Gilmore Simms
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  • Publication date: 1830s (x)
  • Publisher: Lea and Blanchard (x)
  • Holding Institution: University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Library (x)
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      Beauchampe; or, The Kentucky Tragedy. A Tale of Passion.

      Beauchampe; or, The Kentucky Tragedy. A Tale of Passion.

      Novel (Romance) | Lea and Blanchard | 1842
                  Early in the morning of 7 November 1825, in the town of Frankfort, KY, a young lawyer named Jereboam O. Beauchamp crept to the house of the state attorney general, Solomon P. Sharp, and stabbed him to death.  The murder was orchestrated to avenge the honor of Anna Cook[1], Beauchamp’s wife, who as a single woman had been seduced, impregnated, and abandoned by Sharp[2].  The event was a national sensation immediately following its discovery and Beauchamp’s capture days later.  Following Cook and Beauchamp’s failed joint suicide attempt and the latter’s subsequent execution, ...
      The Damsel of Darien

      The Damsel of Darien

      Novel (Romance) | Lea and Blanchard | 1839
                 The Damsel of Darien was published in two volumes in 1839.  Simms first mentioned the story to James Lawson in a 2 September 1838 letter, revealing that he “wrote during the first part of the summer some 150 pages of a new novel & there it sticks.”[1]  Simms informed Lawson in January of 1839 that Damsel would be published with Lea & Blanchard of Philadelphia, who would pay $1000 for a first edition of 3,000 copies; in the meantime, Simms was busy revising the “numerous errors of history & geography” committed while composing the first volume of the story.[2]  ...
      The Kinsmen; or, the Black Riders of Congaree.  A Tale.

      The Kinsmen; or, the Black Riders of Congaree. A Tale.

      Novel (Romance) | Lea and Blanchard | 1841
                  William Gilmore Simms’s third novel of the Revolutionary War (though fifth in order of plot chronology) was originally published in 1841 under the title The Kinsmen.  It became an early offering as part of the Redfield edition under its more popularly-known title The Scout in 1854.  A novel of familial conflict in the context of war and a broad-minded exploration of patriotism across classes, The Scout opens shortly after the Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill (aka the Second Battle of Camden)[1] in May 1781.  The action ends with the British departure from the Star Fort at Ninety ...