Wlliam Gilmore Simms
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  • Creator: Anonymous [William Gilmore Simms] (x)
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      Charleston: The Palmetto City.  An Essay

      Charleston: The Palmetto City. An Essay

      Travel Writings | Harper & Brothers; Southern Studies Program, University of South Carolina | 1857, 1976
                      Charleston: The Palmetto City is a 1976 pamphlet republication of an essay of the same name, originally published anonymously by Simms in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine in June 1857.[1]  The pamphlet edition of this essay is a facsimile of the original Harper’s piece.  In the essay, a rare example of the author’s travel writing, Simms focused on the architecture and geography of his native city, descriptions that are complimented by detailed illustrations of many of the most significant of Charleston’s buildings and memorials.[2]  While a minor work, the essay ...
      Flirtation at the Moultrie House

      Flirtation at the Moultrie House

      Novella | 1850
               One of Simms’s minor works, the epistolary novella, Flirtation at the Moultrie House, presents an interesting picture of society life in mid-century Charleston.  Mary Ann Wimsatt notes that Flirtation, published as a pamphlet in 1850 by Edward C. Councell of Charleston, shows Simms’s “growing talent for brisk descriptions of city life,” while Simms biographer John C. Guilds notes the satiric success of the work:  “Not only is Flirtation of interest because it represents a type of fiction almost wholly different from that characteristically associated with the prolific ...
      Katharine Walton; or, The Rebel of Dorchester. An Historical Romance of the Revolution in Carolina.

      Katharine Walton; or, The Rebel of Dorchester. An Historical Romance of the Revolution in Carolina.

      Novel (Romance) | A. Hart | 1851
                Set in September of 1780, Katharine Walton is the third installment of a trilogy that follows The Partisan and Mellichampein covering the Revolution in South Carolina.[1]  While The Partisan and Mellichampe are set in the interior of the Santee and Wateree rivers, Katharine Walton  takes the reader to the city of Charleston in 1780-81 to trace the social world of South Carolina under British occupation.[2]  The city functions narratively as a “unifying center,” according to John C. Guilds, to free Katharine Walton of the “awkward shifts in action and setting ...