Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Refined by:
  • Creator: Anonymous [William Gilmore Simms] (x)
  • Places of publication: Charleston, SC (x)
Refine by: Refine by people:
    Refine by location:
      The Charleston Book:  A Miscellany in Prose and Verse

      The Charleston Book: A Miscellany in Prose and Verse

      Miscellany | The Reprint Company; Samuel Hart, Sen. | 1845, 1983
                 One of the major American cities of the mid-19th century, Charleston was viewed by its citizens as a hub of culture and erudition equal to that of the other great cities of the time, including New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore.  To illustrate the quality of the city’s intellectual life and literary merits, “Charleston book-seller and Reform Jewish leader Samuel Hart, Sr. proposed that Charlestonians join the trend” of putting together an anthology of writings by city residents, much as several other cities had done throughout the late 1830s.[1]  Simms, the leading ...
      The Cosmopolitan:  An Occasional

      The Cosmopolitan: An Occasional

      Miscellany | Wm. Estill | 1833
                      Simms was the primary, anonymous contributor to the Cosmopolitan: An Occasional, and the two numbers of this short-lived publication reveal the state of his talents at the end of his apprenticeship period.  Issued in May and July 1833 by Wm. Estill of Charleston, the two issues of the Cosmopolitan are among the works leading to what John C. Guilds calls Simms’s “flurry of literary efforts that produced four major works of fiction within the next two years.”.[1] As such, Guilds suggests that the Cosmopolitan be considered not so much for the quality of Simms’s inconsistent ...
      The Golden Christmas: A Chronicle of St. John

      The Golden Christmas: A Chronicle of St. John's, Berkeley

      Novella | Walker, Richards & Co. | 1852
                      Published by Walker & Richards in 1852, The Golden Christmas is novella of social manners set in the lowcountry of Berkeley County near Charleston, South Carolina.  Geography is of central importance to both the book itself and the story within.  Charleston, as the home of the author, the setting of the story, and the location of the publisher and printer is as much the focus of the work as any characters or details of plot; in a 2005 introduction to the novella, critic David Aiken claims that The Golden Christmas “today provides one of the most comprehensive and accurate ...
      The Remains of Maynard Davis Richardson with a Memoir of His Life

      The Remains of Maynard Davis Richardson with a Memoir of His Life

      Documents | O. A. Roorback | 1833
                      One of Simms’s most personal works, The Remains of Maynard Davis Richardson is an editorial project the writer undertook after his good friend Richardson’s premature death at the age of 20 on 12 October 1832.  While details about their friendship remain scarce, it is known that Richardson accompanied Simms on the writer’s first trip to the North,[1] and Simms dedicated his long 1832 narrative poem Atalantis to him, referring to the younger man’s “high moral and intellectual worth” in his dedicatory note.  The families of the two men had been long acquainted ...
      The Sword and the Distaff; or, "Fair, Fat and Forty," A Story of the South, at the Close of Revolution

      The Sword and the Distaff; or, "Fair, Fat and Forty," A Story of the South, at the Close of Revolution

      Novel (Romance) | Walker, Richards & Co. | 1852
             Written in the “midst of one of the most productive creative surges in his career,”[1] Woodcraft; or, Hawks About the Dovecote: A Story of the South at the Close of the Revolution makes the most serious and sustained claim as Simms’s masterpiece in the novel form.[2]  The fifth novel composed in Simms’s saga of the American Revolution, it is set during the chaotic close and aftermath of the war.  This makes it the last (eighth) Revolutionary Romance in terms of chronological action. As the work opens, the British are evacuating Charleston in December 1782. Then the novel shifts ...