Wlliam Gilmore Simms
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  • Publication date: 1850s (x)
  • Creator: Anonymous [William Gilmore Simms] (x)
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    The Sword and the Distaff; or, "Fair, Fat and Forty," A Story of the South, at the Close of Revolution

    The Sword and the Distaff; or, "Fair, Fat and Forty," A Story of the South, at the Close of Revolution

    Novel (Romance) | Walker, Richards & Co. | 1852
           Written in the “midst of one of the most productive creative surges in his career,”[1] Woodcraft; or, Hawks About the Dovecote: A Story of the South at the Close of the Revolution makes the most serious and sustained claim as Simms’s masterpiece in the novel form.[2]  The fifth novel composed in Simms’s saga of the American Revolution, it is set during the chaotic close and aftermath of the war.  This makes it the last (eighth) Revolutionary Romance in terms of chronological action. As the work opens, the British are evacuating Charleston in December 1782. Then the novel shifts ...
    The Tri-Color; or The Three Days of Blood in Paris. With Some Other Pieces

    The Tri-Color; or The Three Days of Blood in Paris. With Some Other Pieces

    Poetry | Wigfall & Davis, Strand | c. 1831
              William Gilmore Simms published The Tri-Color; or the Three Days of Blood, in Paris. With Some Other Pieces in the winter of 1830 or the spring of 1831.  He did so anonymously, and the advertisement at the front of the text says simply, “The Work, now offered to the notice of the British Public, is by an American Citizen.”  Though Simms told James Lawson that he did not “wish to be known as its author for a variety of reasons,” he did list it among his publications multiple times within his letters.[1]  James Kibler suggests that one reason that Simms may have ...
    The Yemassee.  A Romance of Carolina.

    The Yemassee. A Romance of Carolina.

    Novel (Romance) | Harper & Brothers | 1835
                The Yemassee is historically the best known of the long fictions of William Gilmore Simms.  Set on the South Carolina frontier, Simms’s third book-length fiction treats the Yemassee War of 1715-17, when the Yemassee Indians, with their Spanish and Native American allies, attacked the low country colonial settlements.  Writing in the midst of the removal of natives from east of the Mississippi to the newly created Indian Territory in the future Oklahoma, Simms emphasized such motives for the war as the colonists’ need for land, the conflict between rival European powers ...
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