Wlliam Gilmore Simms
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A Map of that Part of America, that is now the Seat of War, from Quebeck [sic] to Fort Duquesne, comprehending the English Settlement, on the Sea Coast

A Map of that Part of America, that is now the Seat of War, from Quebeck [sic] to Fort Duquesne, comprehending the English Settlement, on the Sea Coast

Map | 1758-11
          William Gilmore Simms's collection of scrapbooks represents one of the most significant, but least accessible, resources for the study of the writer. Housed as a part of the Charles Carroll Simms collection in the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina, there are nine volumes of scrapbooks, each comprised of works of numerous genres from throughout Simms's career.[1] While the majority of the included works are Simms's own, the scrapbooks also features writings by others, as well as works of uncertain authorship. Prior to digitizing these volumes, access to them ...
A New Map of Virginia, from the best Authorities

A New Map of Virginia, from the best Authorities

Map
          William Gilmore Simms's collection of scrapbooks represents one of the most significant, but least accessible, resources for the study of the writer. Housed as a part of the Charles Carroll Simms collection in the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina, there are nine volumes of scrapbooks, each comprised of works of numerous genres from throughout Simms's career.[1] While the majority of the included works are Simms's own, the scrapbooks also features writings by others, as well as works of uncertain authorship. Prior to digitizing these volumes, access to them ...
Morals in Free States / Rare Domestic Productions (Two Items)

Morals in Free States / Rare Domestic Productions (Two Items)

Journalism
          William Gilmore Simms's collection of scrapbooks represents one of the most significant, but least accessible, resources for the study of the writer. Housed as a part of the Charles Carroll Simms collection in the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina, there are nine volumes of scrapbooks, each comprised of works of numerous genres from throughout Simms's career.[1] While the majority of the included works are Simms's own, the scrapbooks also features writings by others, as well as works of uncertain authorship. Prior to digitizing these volumes, access to them ...
The History of South Carolina, From Its First European Discovery to Its Erection into a Republic

The History of South Carolina, From Its First European Discovery to Its Erection into a Republic

History | S. Babcock & Co. | 1840
            Believing it “necessary to the public man, as to the pupil,” Simms undertook The History of South Carolina explicitly for the education of the state’s young people, so as to tell them the vibrant history of the state and the distinguished accomplishments of her leaders.[1]  There is evidence to suggest that Simms was particularly motivated to write such a history in order to provide an historical account of South Carolina and notable South Carolinians, to his eldest child Augusta, who was attending boarding school in Massachusetts in the late 1830s.[2]  Simms seemingly ...
The History of South Carolina, From Its First European Discovery to Its Erection into a Republic

The History of South Carolina, From Its First European Discovery to Its Erection into a Republic

History | S. Babcock & Co. | 1842
            Believing it “necessary to the public man, as to the pupil,” Simms undertook The History of South Carolina explicitly for the education of the state’s young people, so as to tell them the vibrant history of the state and the distinguished accomplishments of her leaders.[1]  There is evidence to suggest that Simms was particularly motivated to write such a history in order to provide an historical account of South Carolina and notable South Carolinians, to his eldest child Augusta, who was attending boarding school in Massachusetts in the late 1830s.[2]  Simms seemingly ...
The History of South Carolina, from its First European Discovery to its Erection into a Republic

The History of South Carolina, from its First European Discovery to its Erection into a Republic

History | Redfield | 1860
            Believing it “necessary to the public man, as to the pupil,” Simms undertook The History of South Carolina explicitly for the education of the state’s young people, so as to tell them the vibrant history of the state and the distinguished accomplishments of her leaders.[1]  There is evidence to suggest that Simms was particularly motivated to write such a history in order to provide an historical account of South Carolina and notable South Carolinians, to his eldest child Augusta, who was attending boarding school in Massachusetts in the late 1830s.[2]  Simms seemingly ...