Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Southward Ho! A Spell of Sunshine >> Chapter V / The Pilgrim of Love >> Page 65

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Novel (Romance) | Redfield | 1854
Transcription TIIE PILGRIM OF LOVE.

hope�and should be ours,�might witness the purification of
his stains through the saving grace of his Redeemer."

Our Jerseyan, having finished his voluntary yarn, was voted
the thanks of the company; and it was then unanimously agreed
that our Gotliamite should take up the reel, and see what he
could do, at warp and woof, in the business of invention.
We were promised a story of the troubadours, I think, sir,"
said Miss Burroughs.
We all concurred in the subject thus indicated, and, after
certain modest preliminaries, Duyckman gave us a curious pic-
ture of the fantastical sentiment�serious enough in its way--
of which we may find so many remarkable examples in the his-
tory of chivalry and the crusades. It may not be amiss to ap-
prise the reader that he will find an actual biography in what
follows.
-------
THE PILGRIM OF LOVE.
" Sails, oars, that might not save, The death he sought, to Geoffrey Rudel gave."
PETRARCH.


THE history of the Provencal troubadours is full of grateful
and instructive material---curious as history, instructive as de-
veloping a highly-artificial state of society, and full of' interest
as literary biography. To the young poet, the study is one
which will teach many useful lessons of his art. To the pas-
sionate dreamer of romance, it will yield delicious provocations
to revery, in which all his ideals will be satisfied. These biog-
raphies should be written out by poets ; not in verse, for that
might suggest doubts of their veracity, but in a prose at once
sparkling and sentimental ; uniting the oriental fancy of Curtis,
with the sighing pathos of a Norton or a Landon. We commend
the idea to study and examination ; and will content ourselves,
in the meantime, with a brief sketch of one. of the most remark-
able troubadours of his age and order.
Geoffrey Rudel was a prince of Blaye, as well as a trouba-
dour. In those days, nobility was not inconsistent with letters.