Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Southward Ho! A Spell of Sunshine >> Chapter XII / The Picture of Judgment; Or, The Grotta Del Tifone >> Page 242

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Novel (Romance) | Redfield | 1854
Transcription 242 SOUTHWARD HO
it is a truth that can not save. Death is upon us � I see it in
thy face�I feel it in my heart. Oh ! would that I could doubt
thy story !"" Doubt not� doubt not believe and take me to thy heart.
I fear not death if thou wilt believe me. My Coelius, let me
come to thee and die upon thy bosom."" Ah ! shouldst thou betray me shouldst thou still practise
upon me with thy woman art!"" And wherefore ? It is death, thou say'st, that is upon us.
now. What shall I gain, in this hour, by speaking to thee false-
ly ? Thou hast done thy worst. Thou bast doomed me to
death, and to the scornful eyes of the confiding future !"
She threw her arms around him as she spoke, and sunk, sunk
sobbing upon his breast.
Ah !" he exclaimed, that dreadful picture ! I feel, my
Aurelio, that thou hast spoken truly that I have been rash
and cruel in my judgment. Thy brother lies before thee, and
yonder tomb is prepared for thee. I did not yield without a
struggle, and I prepared me for a terrible sacrifice. Upon this
bier, liabited as I am, I yield myself to death. There is no
help�no succor. Yet that picture ! Shall the falsehood over-
come the truth. Shall that lie survive thy virtues, thy beauty,
and thy life ! No ! my Aurelio, this crime shall be spared at
least."
He unwound her arms from about his neck, and strove to rise.
.C,

She sunk in the same moment at his feet. " Oh, death !" she
cried, thou art, indeed, a god! I feel thee, terrible in thy
strength, with an agony never felt before. Leave me not, my
Coelius --forgive �and leave me not !"
I lose thee, Aurelio ! Where "
Here ! before the couch �I faint�ah !"" I would destroy," he cried, but can not ! This blindness.
Ho ! without there ! Aruns ! It is thy step I hear ! Undo,
undo I forgive thee all, if thou wilt but help. Here�hither !"
The acute senses of the dying man had, indeed, heard foot-
steps without. They were those of the perfidious brother. But,
at the call from within, he retreated hastily. There was no an-
swer�there was no help. But there was still some consciousness.
Death was not yet triumphant. There was a pang yet to be felt.