Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Southward Ho! A Spell of Sunshine >> Chapter XVI / Spirit-Whisperings. - Reminiscence >> Page 347

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Novel (Romance) | Redfield | 1854
Transcription CHAPTER XVI.
SPIRIT-WHISPERINGS.� REMINISCENCE.
THE thanks of our little company were frankly given to our
young North-Carolinian, who had delivered himself much more
successfully than we were prepared to expect, from the previous
scenes in which his simplicity had quite failed to suspect the
quizzings of the Alabamian. That satirical worthy joined in the
applause with great good humor and evident sincerity, though
he could not forbear his usual fling at the venerable North State.
Verily, thou bast done well, my young friend from the em-
pire of Terebintli ; thou bast delivered thyself with a commend-
able modesty and simplicity, which merits our best acknowledg-
ments. Pray, suppose me, among the rest, to be eminently de-
lighted and grateful accordingly. That a tragedy so grave, and
so symmetrical as the one you have told, could have been con-
jured out of any of the historical or the traditional material of
North Carolina, I could scarcely have believed. I have been
pleased to think her genius too saturnine or phlegmatic for
such conceptions. If she lost the phlegm for a moment, it was
to indulge in a spasmodic sort of cacchination. She relishes the
ludicrous at times. Travelling last summer over her railroad
to the east, we came to a place called ' Strickland.'
Strickland !' cries the conductor : and at the word, an old
woman got out, and a group of smiling country-girls got in.
Strickland, indeed !' exclaimed one Jeruthan Dobbs, an
aged person in a brown linen overall, and with a mouth from ear
to ear, defiled at both extremities, with the brownest juices of
the weed�' Strickland, indeed ! that's one of them big words
they've got up now, to take in people that don't know. The
people all about here calls the place ' Tear-Shirt' and they
kain't be got to 1'arn your fine big name for it. Strickland's
quite too big a mouthful for a corn-cracker.'