Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Joscelyn: A Tale of the Revolution >> Chapter II: Malcontents in Council >> Page 12

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Novel (Romance) | The Reprint Company | 1975, 1976
Transcription I2JOSCELYN
the wearer, at a glance, with a single blow of the fist. Such was
the feeling of Walter, just as if he himself had received a blow.
But the young man subdued himself, and, with a slight incli-
nation of the head, turned away his eyes till they met with the
coarser and more savage countenance of Browne. To him, also, he
bowed slightly, and now, looking at his father, he slowly drew
nigh to the table where the parties had been sitting, and where,
from the quantity of papers and memoranda which lay scattered
before them, they had evidently been greatly busied.
As the eyes of the young man settled down upon these papers,
Cameron rather hastily drew nigh, swept them together with his
hands, and, without arranging, proceeded to bundle and tie them
together in a single package.
Walter turned away with something like loathing in his look,
and stood patiently confronting his father.
"By my faith, Mr. Walter Dunbar," said the old man sharply,
"you are something deliberate in your movements this morning."
"Not more so than usual, I think, sir."
"Ah! but I think differently, sir."
"It may be so, sir. There are periods when we require to be
unusually deliberate. It is, at all times, due to my profession that
I should be deliberate. Unlike medicine, which requires that the
physician should be prompt, and should lose no time either for
or with the patient, the lawyer has need to save all the time he
can "
"And his breath, too, sir, we should trust, if only the better to
cool his porritch. But have you no civil courtesy for our friends
here?"
"I have acknowledged their presence here, sir, with the usual
courtesy."
"What ! you mean with a little nod, a sort of twist of neck or
bob of head, sir. That seems but scant courtesy, I'm thinking, to
such old friends of the family, sir."
"Scant as the courtesy may be, sir, it is one which neither of
them has had the courtesy to acknowledge or return."