Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Joscelyn: A Tale of the Revolution >> Chapter XV: Major Alison—The Orchard Scene >> Page 145

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Novel (Romance) | The Reprint Company | 1975, 1976
Transcription CHAPTER XV.
MAJOR ALISON THE ORCHARD SCENE.
The person who furnished us the chief subject of conversation in
the preceding dialogue of brother and sister, was not insensible to the
prejudice against him which he had inspired in the mind, the blood,
or the brain of Walter Dunbar. His vanity had saved him, however,
from any suspicion of a like prejudice in the bosom of the sister. Nor
was he aware, nor did he suspect, that there existed any tender rela-
tions between the fair Annie and her modest lover, Martin Joscelyn,
or any other person. He had not seen that young man at Dunbar's
on any of the occasions when the latter had visited the house; and
had every reason to suppose unless an exception was to be made in
his own favor that her "maiden meditations" were all "fancy free."
But he had no sort of doubt in regard to the feelings of Walter
Dunbar. He`judged, in some degree, of the moods of the latter, by
the feelings in his own breast. These young men, at their very first
meeting, had, by infallible instincts, been made conscious of a certain
moral antagonism, which no subsequent experience could lessen or
remove.
Walter Dunbar found something in the self-complacency of Alison
which was enough to offend his own self-esteem, at a single glance.
Besides, he found him a familiar guest, in possession of his father's
house, and making himself as perfectly at home in it as if his rights
were paramount. He appeared, also, to be in possession of the con-
fidence of that father, who had shown himself none. And these were
sufficient grounds for annoyance. They kept him moody, if not fret-
ful.
Alison beheld in young Dunbar quite a rival to himself in all per-
sonal respects �a goodly figure, a graceful carriage, an easy manner,
and a fine, intelligent and expressive face. But these were dashed,
in his eyes, by a coldness, distance, and reserve, amounting almost to
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