Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Joscelyn: A Tale of the Revolution >> Chapter XXIII: Gulliver in Lilliput >> Page 212

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Novel (Romance) | The Reprint Company | 1975, 1976
Transcription CHAPTER XXIII.
GULLIVER IN LILLIPUT.
Calm as the summer atmosphere which he was breathing, Stephen
Joscelyn sate in his chair of authority, pursuing his wonted drudgeries
of the "Oldfield School" master. His thoughts sometimes reverted
to the little billet of warning which he had received, and he occa-
sionally read and re-read it, as if with the hope to discover some-
thing more from its meagre sentence something of latent meaning
which had before escaped him. But in vain; and, unable to dis-
cover anything definite in the warning, he laid it down, aside only
to muse upon Angelica ! Very sad and bitter were his musings. How
much more bitter they were to become, when all should be known
of the performances of that lovely damsel!
Suddenly, the thundering tread of a horse is heard along the high-
way. It leaves the highway, and the next moment is at the school-
house door. In another moment the door is thrown open, wide, and
Walter Dunbar stalks in, lofty, large, wearing a high head. In his
right hand he carries a horse-whip. In his countenance there is the
expression of a deeply-seated wrath. In his air and manner are
dogged determination, and a fury which is but imperfectly hidden
beneath a studied effort to appear cool and scornful.
These expressions of countenance, air and manner, were not at first
visible to Stephen, who sat at the opposite extremity of the room. He
had simply discovered who was the visitor, but without yet noticing
the written language of his features; accordingly, Stephen Joscelyn
called out in hearty tones:
"Welcome, Mr. Dunbar. I am glad to see you."
He could use no other language to the close friend of his brother.
He could conceive of no reason why he should employ other terms
of speech, and though not intimate with Walter, and not, perhaps,
esteeming him so greatly as did his brother, he had certainly no
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