Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Joscelyn: A Tale of the Revolution >> Chapter XXX: Highway Adventures >> Page 256

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Page 256

Novel (Romance) | The Reprint Company | 1975, 1976
Transcription CHAPTER XXX.
HIGHWAY ADVENTURES.
Walter Dunbar started to his feet. The stranger was only a few
feet from him as he spoke. He had emerged from a thicket covert,
which spread in the rear all along one side of the little rivulet, where
Walter had partaken his repast; and had probably been resting there
at the time of his arrival. He had heard with ease every syllable
which, in the full belief that he was alone, Walter had spoken aloud,
but, as he fancied, only to his own senses.
A fiery blush overspread the cheek and face of the young man, as
he found that he had been overheard : but he was too much taken by
surprise to speak. He could only gaze vacantly upon the new corner,
who was a young man scarcely older than himself. He was garbed
in the long hunting shirt of the mountain country, with cape and
fringes, which seemed once to have been of better material than was
commonly in use. But his garment was frayed and torn, and there
were stains of the soil upon it which argued a life recently of some
experience. He wore leggins and moccasins of Indian fashion. A
knife at his belt, and a long rifle which he bore carelessly in his grasp,
constituted his only weapons. His coon-skin cap, somewhat dilapi-
dated, scarcely covered his head, and could not conceal the thick
shock of brown hair which broke from under it in curling masses.
The face was fair, frank and florid, full and massive, and was lighted
up by eyes of a bright blue, and a marvellous expression of vitality.
All the features were well pronounced, and the breadth of the jaws
terminating in a well developed and finely rounded chin, spoke for
energy and prompt decision of character.
There was a vague notion in Walter's mind that he had some-
where before met with the stranger; but the more he surveyed him,
the less assured he grew in respect to this previous knowledge, and
he soon dismissed it from his thoughts.
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