Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Beauchampe; or, The Kentucky Tragedy. A Tale of Passion. >> Chapter XIII >> Page 123

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Page 123

Novel (Romance) | Lea and Blanchard | 1842
Transcription BEAUCHAMPE. 123

You, gran'pa, won't take the love ; Bill Hinkley can't
stomach the law, and the trout alone can bring about a
reconciliation. Come, gran'pa, I'm resolved on getting
your supper to-night, and you must go and see me do it."" On one condition only, Ned."" What's that, gran'pa ?"" That you both sup with me."" Done for myself. What say you, Bill 1"
The youth gave a sad assent, and the rattling youth
proceeded.
�The best cure of grief is eating. Love is a sort of
pleasant grief. Many a case of affliction have I seen
mended by a beefsteak. Fish is better. Get a lover to
eat, rouse up his appetites, and, to the same extent, you
lessen his affections. Hot suppers keep down the sensi-
bilities ; and, gran'pa, after ours, to-night, you shall have
the fiddle. If I don't make her speak to you to-night., my
name's Brag, and you need never again believe me."
And the good-humoured youth, fathering up his canes,
led the way to the hills, slowly followed by his two less
elastic companions.
CHAPTER XIII.

THE route, which conducted them over a range of gently
ascending hills, through groves tolerably thick, an un-
cleared woodland tract comprising every variety of pleasant
foliage, at length brought them to a lonely tarn or lake,
about a mile in circumference, nestled and crouching in
the hollow of the hills, which, in some places sloped
gently down to its margin, at others hung abruptly over
its deep and pensive waters. A thick fringe of shrubs,
water-grasses, and wild flowers girdled its edges, and gave
a dark and mysterious expression to its face. There were
many beaten tracks, narrow paths for individual wayfarers
on foot, which conducted down to favourite fishing spots.
These were found chiefly on those sides of the lake where
the ;rocks were precipitous. Perched on a jutting emi-
nence, and half shrouded in the bushes which clothed it,