Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Stories and Tales >> Flirtation at the Moultrie House >> Page 390

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Short Stories | U of South Carolina P | 1974
Transcription 390FLIRTATION AT THE MOULTRIE HOUSE
did not exaggerate. If you are serious, I repeat, the sooner you are
here the better. By the way, push down in season for a great Costume
Ball which takes place on the 29th. Bring with you your dress of
the Texan hunter. It shows your person off to the best advantage,
and I know how well you can play the part. It will be the very
thing for the occasion. I shall go as a Cumanche chief.
Yours truly,
TOM APPLEBY.
LETTER EIGHTH.
Tom Appleby, at the Moultrie House, to his uncle, Edward S.
Appleby, Esq., of Georgia.
DEAR UNCLE:
I enclose you a printed report, from one of the newspapers of
Charleston, describing the great blow-out at the Moultrie House the
other night. You will see among those who figured on the occasion,
your humble servant, as a Cumanche. Dick Meriwether went as a
Texan Hunter, and did it famously, as usual. Georgiana went as
"Amy Robsart," and was very pretty; while her "dear friend,"
Soph. Kirkland, who is likely to prove a dear friend, indeed, was
very magnificent as Cleopatra. The whole affair was a very splendid
one, though there was less of a crowd than would have been there,
(and was anticipated) had it not been for this cursed broken bone
fever, as they call it; an attack of it, which has prevented me from
writing you before, I am just rising from. It seized me very suddenly,
the day after the ball, coming on with headache; which, at first,
I ascribed to my too frequent potations of champaigne and madeira,
the night before. It stuck to me, in the shape of ache, soreness and
fever for three days, and leaves me mighty weak about the legs and
back. But I feed well, and have never lost my appetite. The ball, let
me tell you, was a huckleberry much above my percimmon. I never
saw any thing like it before. The newspaper notice will give you
some notion of it. The supper tables were glorious, feeding eye and
appetite at the same time, and to the great satisfaction of both.