Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina >> Speech on the Justice of Receiving Petitions for the Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia >> Page 23

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Page 23

Speech | The Reprint Company; John F. Trow & Co. | 1866, 1978
Transcription 23

asers of the poor slaves. They made the matter a topic of conversation on almost all occasions. Several societies of ladies in this country have already commenced the 'same course with good success. Let the female sex, then, throughout the land, emulate the efforts made by their sisters over the ocean, in'this work of benevolence.
" Juvenile Societies, :too, may be engaged in the same work. Children are all Abolitionists.
* ~r. * * * *
" We hope Abolitionists will everywhere make it a personal business to distribute the .publications ; that they will not let them be thrown away, but put them in the hands, only, of those who will read and think. Let no Abolitionist, at home or abroad, ever be without a sup-ply, and be ready to embrace every favorable opportunity.
"Petitions to Congress for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia should be put in circulation immediately. The minds of the members of Congress should, if possible, be enlightened as to the real design of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and their prejudices should be removed, as in many it may easily be, by personal interviews with Abolitionists. The way may thus be prepared for a more favorable hearing before the representatives of the people. * * *
(Signed) " ARTHUR TAPPAN,
JOHN RANKIN,
LEWIS TAPPAN,
JOSHUA LEAVITT,
SAMUEL E. CORNISH, WILLIAM GOODELL, ABRAHAM L. Cog, THEODORE S. WRIGHT, SIMEON S. JOCELYN, ELIZAR WRIGHT, Jr.
Executive Committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society."
Here, Sir, is a number of the paper entitled " Hu-
man Rights "a neat, well-printed sheet. Here are
several numbers of the " Anti-Slavery Record," on the
outside of each 'of which is a picture representing a
master flogging naked slaves, and each of which con-
tains within pictures equally revolting. Here is a hand-
ful of the little primer called the " Slave's Friend."
On the covers, and within each of these, are also pic-
tures calculated to excite the feelings, and to nurture