Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina >> Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina >> Letter to the Free Church of Glasgow, on the Subject of Slavery

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Letter to the Free Church of Glasgow, on the Subject of Slavery

Correspondence | John F. Trow & Co.; The Reprint Company | 1866, 1978

Introduction

                Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina was originally published in New York by John F. Trow & Co. in 1866.  The Southern Studies Program at the University of South Carolina included Selections in the South Caroliniana Series, and so it was published by the Reprint Company in 1978.  James Henry Hammond (1807-1864) served South Carolina as a member of Congress from 1835-1836, governor from 1842-1844, and United States senator from 1857 until 1860, when he resigned upon South Carolina’s secession from the Union.  Hammond was described as a “most intimate friend” of Simms by one of the daughters of notable judge and legislator A.P. Aldrich, and “perhaps the one man to whom Simms ever surrendered the floor in argument or conversation.”  Despite Hammond’s personal scandals, Simms once wrote to him: “Were you as rarely good as you are rarely endowed, you would be one of the most perfect men living.”[1]  Although the work was not originally credited to Simms in 1866, Clyde N. Wilson argued in his introduction to the 1978 edition that the format of the volume, combined with the details in Simms’s correspondence, strongly suggests that he compiled and edited Selections during the war.[2]  Wilson’s supposition would be confirmed in the 2012 publication of The Letters of William Gilmore Simms, Volume VI. 

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