Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina >> An Oration on the Life, Character, and Services of John Caldwell Calhoun, Delivered on the 21st November 1850, in Charleston, S.C., at the Request of the City Council >> Page 231

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Speech | The Reprint Company; John F. Trow & Co. | 1866, 1978
Transcription AN ORATION
ON THE LIFE, CHARACTER AND SERVICES OF JOHN CALDWELL CALHOUN, DELIVERED ON THE 21sT NOVEMBER, 1850, IN CHARLESTON, 8. C., AT THE REQUEST OF THE CITY COUNCIL.
FAITH is an instinct of the human heart. Its
strongest, its purest and its noblest instinct the pa-
rent of love and of hope. In all ages and every-
where, mankind have acknowledged, adored, and put
their trust in the great Creator and Ruler of the Uni-
verse. And, descending from the invisible and infi-
nite, to the visible and finite, they have entertained
the same sentiments, differing only in degree, for those
of their own species, wto have received from heaven
an extraordinary endowment of intellect and virtue.
The Ancient Heathen deified them. By the early
Christians they were enrolled among the Saints. It
is a shallow and a base philosophy which can see su-
perstition only, in such customs, and fails to recognize
the workings of a profound veneration for the attri-
butes of God, as manifested through His favorite Cre-
ations. A better knowledge of the bounds which,
separate the natural from the supernatural, has taught
us in our day to limit our homage ; but still it is a
deep and pure wisdom which counsels us to submit