Wlliam Gilmore Simms
Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond, of South Carolina >> Explanatory Notes >> Page 369

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Documents | The Reprint Company; John F. Trow & Co. | 1866, 1978
Transcription EXPLANATORY NOTES
REPORT AT A MEETING OF THE STATE RIGHTS
AND FREE TRADE PARTY
7.15 "the two Judges": David Johnson (1782—1855) and John
Belton O'Neall (1793–1863), two of the three members of the
South Carolina Court of Appeals, had declared the "test oath"
unconstitutional with William Harper dissenting. The Court of
Appeals was abolished in 1835. In addition to his judicial
offices O'Neall was an author and temperance advocate.
Johnson was Governor of South Carolina during 1846-1848.
9.2 "O'Neale": A common misspelling of John Belton O'Neall's
surname.
13.23 "the express reservation" : The Tenth Amendment of the
U.S. Constitution.
SPEECH ON THE JUSTICE OF RECEIVING
ABOLITION PETITIONS
15.heading: This speech was delivered in the U.S. House of
Representatives on February 1, 1836.
15.1 "Mr. Cushing": Caleb Cushing (1800-1879), at this time
Representative from Massachusetts. He subsequently held
numerous public offices as Whig, Democrat, and Republican,
including U.S.Attorney General and Minister to China.
16.6 "concur in every principle which he laid down" : In his
speech on January 25 Cushing had deprecated abolitionism but
defended the right of petition.
24.7 "P.M.": Postmaster.
29.3 "Dr. Channing has softened the asperity of his re-
marks": William Ellery Channing (1780-1842), Unitarian theo-
logian, had in his work Slavery (1835) criticized abolitionists as
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