Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> II. >> Page 65

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION. 65
this being the fact, South-Carolina was one of the first colo-
nies to precipitate events, as the following statements will suf-
ficiently show :
1. The first steps towards a continental union were taken in
South-Carolina, before the measure had been agreed upon by
any colony south of New-England. This was so far back as
1765, immediately upon the passage of the stamp act.
2. South-Carolina was the first of the colonies that formed
an independent constitution. This was done in March, 1776,
and prior to the recommendation of Congress to that effect.
But, in fact, an independent government had been in exis-
tence in the colony from the 6th clay of July, 1774. On that
day, a large convention of the people was held, and an unani-
mous vote was passed to support Massachusetts in the vindi-
cation of her rights. Except nominally, from that moment
the Royal Government ceased to exist within the province.
The country became, on the instant, singularly popular, being
governed actually by popular committees and voluntary asso-
ciations, whose authority was rarely resisted.
3. In September, 1175, the royal governor convened an
assembly, to provide for public exigencies, when the members
gave him a singular proof of their republican tempers, their
first and only act being the passage of a resolution, approving and affirming the popular resolutions of the convention of
July, 1774. Fearful of more republicanism, the Governor
immediately dissolved the Assembly.
4. On the 11th January, 1775, the first revolutionary Jro-
vincial Congress met, and laid the foundation for the more
regular meeting of the convention of March, 1776, by which
the first constitution of South-Carolina was formed.
5. The convention of 1775 stamped money, established a
Court of Adrnirality, for the condemnation of British vessels,
issued letters of marque and reprisal, and, on the 9th Septern-