Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> III. >> Page 84

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription 84 SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION.
corps, with some volunteers—altogether about 250. Came
to Charleston in the evening, and put up at Mrs. Minis's,
though disagreeable on account of some British persons quar-
tered at her house. Hogan's brigade arrived in town 3d
inst." [Journal of Gen. McIntosh, &c.]
The complaint from which Moultrie suffered, was the
gout—a not unmilitary disorder, since it never suffers a sol-
dier to run.
" 12th March. Found the enemy had possession of James
Island, since the latter end of February, and were now erect-
ing a work upon Bunker Hill, behind Fort Johnson. We
saw their fleet, transports, store-ships, merchantmen, &c., in
Stono river,, Wappoo Cut, from Ferguson's house, in Tradd
street ; and some men-of-war over the bar. Our horse skir-
mished near Ashley Ferry." [Mclntosh's Journal.]
Tarleton writes :
" The army immediately took possession of John's Island
and Stono Ferry. James Island, Perronneau's landing, Wap-
poo Cut, and other adjacent places were soon after obtained ;
and by a bridge thrown over the canal, the necessary com-
munications were secured, and the advanced part of the
King's army occupied the bank of Ashley river, opposite to
Charleston."
13th March. The enemy took possession of the land on
Ashley river opposite the town, constructed a battery near the
mouth of Wappoo, on the prolongation of Tradd street."
[De Brahm.]
" 13th March. The enemy burnt Fenwicke's house on
Wappoo Neck, (made a pest house for the small-pox,) and
erected a battery of three or four (six) heavy cannon—dis-
tance yards from the town. I was ordered to take
the command of the South-Carolina country militia." [Mc-
Intosh.]
" 13th March. Yesterday morning presented to our view
an astonishing instance of the enemy's industry and labour,
in a battery with five embrazures at the western point of
Wappoo, close by Fenwicke's landing, which in no shape could be said to exist at sunset the preceding evening. A