Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> III. >> Page 116

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription 116 SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION.
" 8th April. Gen. Lincoln received no report from Fort
Moultrie, until the afternoon of Sunday, when Major Pinckney
came up and informed that not a single man had been hurt,
and but about ten of the enemy's shot struck any part of the
works. . . . Sunday afternoon, Capt. Crawley's galley
advanced upon the headmost ship belonging to the enemy,
and gave her several shot, which were returned very briskly
from the ship. The galley then retired." [Moses Young.]
The British had now gone through all the preliminaries of
investment. A single passage or two from Tarleton, will suf-
fice to connect events in the chain of our narrative.
" The General and his engineers having fixed upon the point
and mode of attack, a large working party broke ground, un-
der cover of an advanced detachment, on the night of the 1st
of April. Two large redoubts were thrown up within 800
yards of the American lines, and were not discovered before
daybreak, when the fire from the town had very inconsiderable
erect. The next evening another redoubt was add-ed, and for
five successive days and nights, the labour of artificers and
soldiers was directed to the construction of batteries, which,
on the 8th (April) were completed with artillery
The Roebuck, Richmond, Romulus, Blonde, Virginia, Raleigh,
Sandwich and Renown, weighed about one o'clock, and ex-
hibited a magnificent and satisfactory specth cleto the royalists,
by steadily effecting their passage, under the fire of the Amer-
ican batteries, with the trifling loss of 27 men, killed and
wounded. 'I ire Acetus, a store-ship, grounded and was burnt.
. . . . The frigates, now taking a position under James
Island, blocked up the harbour, and Charlestown was debarred
from all communication with the country, except in that quar-
ter which faced the river, Cooper." [Campaipns.]
" 9th April. The vessel which grounded was abandoned
and burnt by the crew last night. This morning the com-
mencement of a battery (L) appeared in front of our left.
Our yorkrnen employed as heretofore." [De Brahnz.]
9th April. The enemy last night carried on their ap-
proaches from their left redoubt, and threw up a battery for
ten cannon against the angle of our advanced redoubt, or half
moon battery, and the sedan No 7. Cannonading as usual,