Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> III. >> Page 132

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription 132 SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION.
" 23d April. Fire from the batteries as usual. The enemy
extended the saps of his second parallel." [DeBrahm.]
" 23d April. The enemy's approaches continually carrying
on upon our right and left ; those on our right within twenty
yards of our dam. A mortar moved from the right of Col.
Parker's encampment. About 8 at night, two deserters from
the enemy. They confirm the report of a considerable rein-
forcement (Lord Cornwallis with 2,500 men) from New-York ;
that they detached ten companies of light infantry to go over
to Haddrill's Point ; and say the enemy lost a number of
men lately by our shells." [Melntosh.]
Tarleton writes :
" A considerable corps of troops recently arrived from New-
York, enabled Sir Henry Clinton to strengthen the detach-
ment under Webster. The importance of the command, and
the critical situation of the enemy, induced him to request
Lieut. Gen. Earl Cornwallis to direct the future operations of
the army on the east side of Cooper river. The intention of
Gen. Lincoln, in fortifying Lempriere's Point, seems to have
been counteracted by the arrival of Lord Cornwallis with ad-
ditional troops, as it was evacuated soon after that event."
[ Campaigns.]
" 24th April. Fire from the batteries as usual. This morn-
ing at day break, a party of 200 men, under Col. Henderson,
made a sortie upon the enemy's works, which caused a gene-
ral fire of musketry on both sides. The party returned in a
little while with 12 prisoners. Our loss was one captain and
one soldier killed." [De Bra/m.]
24th April. A party of 200 men, detached from the
Virginians and South-Carolinians, under the command of
Lieut. Col. Henderson, sallied out at daylight this morning,
opposite the ` half moon,' or advanced battery, upon the
enemy's approaches, and completely surprised them in their
trenches. About 15 of them were killed with the bayonet in
their ditches, and 12 prisoners brought off, seven of whom
were wounded. The enemy attempted to support them, but
were obliged to retreat upon our giving them some rounds of
grape shot. " The prisoners say Major Hall, of the 74th regi-
ment, commanded them, but no officer was to be found.