Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> III. >> Page 136

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription 136 SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION.
He wished to leave the garrison immediately ; but General
Lincoln would not allow him, because it would dispirit the
troops." A council of war was called, to consider this un-
pleasant opinion of Duportail. Here it was proposed again
that the place should be evacuated, and the continental troops
privately withdrawn. But, says Moultrie, " when the citizens
were informed upon what the council were deliberating, some
of them came into council and expressed themselves very
warmly, declaring to Lincoln, that if he attempted to with-
draw his troops they would cut up his boats and open the
gates to the enemy. This put a stop to all thoughts of an
evacuation."
27th April. De Brahm only reports " as usual." McIn-
tosh gives a full report of the events of the day, his details
being confirmed, as is generally the case, by Moultrie, who
seems, indeed, to have freely used this journal of McIntosh.
" 27th April. Last night, Col. Malmedy, with his detach-
ment, at Lempriere's Ferry, retreated in great confusion across
the river, after spiking-up four eighteen-pounders they left
behind. About 1 in the afternoon, four of the enemy's gal-
lies, an armed sloop and a frigate, moved down the river, and
anchored opposite and near the mouth of Hog Island, after
a very faint opposition from the cannon of Fort Moultrie.
One of the gallies got aground, and was lost. Five militia-
men of James Island (Capt. Stiles,) deserted last night in a
boat. One private killed and five wounded. Tar barrels
ordered to be fixed before our lines every evening, and burn
all night, to prevent a surprise, as the enemy are close to the
canal, and keep up almost a continued running fire of small
arms, night and day, upon us. A picquet, of a field officer
and 100 men, of my militia brigade, ordered every evening
to Gadsden's old house, to support a small guard of a ser-
geant and 12 regulars, upon the wharf, in case of an attack
by the enemy's boats upon that quarter. Major Pinckney
ordered out on same duty."" 28th April. As usual. Last night our post at Lem-