Wlliam Gilmore Simms
South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War >> III. >> Page 140

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Reviews/Essays | Walker & James, Publishers | 1853
Transcription 140 SOUTH-CAROLINA IN THE REVOLUTION.
viz : that our works could only be called field lines, and could
hold out but a very few days, etc." [1Tfclntosh.]
May 1. De Brahm writes of the three first days of May,
that all goes on " as usual."" Our hospital ship taken by
the English, and carried higher up the river."" May 1. Our fatigue employed in erecting another redoubt
on the left of the horn work, and completing. These new
works intended for a retreat, in case of necessity. The enemy
appear to be about another battery, their third parallel, oppo-
site No. 12, on our right. Five men deserted last night from
the gallies, which yet remain in Wappoo Creek ; the many
risks they ran in the attempt is astonishing. A very smart
bombardment kept up during this day. Capt. Mumford, of
North-Carolina, wounded by a musket ball, and Mr. P. Lord,
a volunteer, [in the continental artillery,] killed yesterday by
a shell.", [McIntosh.]
Moultrie, on the same day, gives us quite a lively picture
of the exhaustion and exposure consequent upon the inces-
sant duties of the besieged. " Mr. Lord and Mr. Basquin,
two volunteers, were sleeping upon a mattrass together, when
Mr. Lord was killed by a shell falling upon him ; and Mr.
Basquin, at the same time, had the hair of his head burnt,
yet did not wake 'till he was called upon. The fatigue in
the advanced redoubt was so great, that, for want of sleep,
many faces were so swelled they could scarcely see out of
their eyes. I was obliged to relieve Major Mitchell, the com-
manding officer. They were constantly on the look-out for
the shells, that were continually falling among them. It was
by far the most dangerous post on the lines. On my visit to
this battery, not having been there for a day or two. I took
the usual way of going in, which .was a bridge that crossed
our ditch, quite exposed to the enemy. In the meantime,
they had advanced their works within 70 or 80 yards of the