Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Cub of the Panther: A Hunter Legend of the ''Old North State'' >> Chapter Two: Matrimonial Speculations—How Women are to be Won, and So Forth. >> Page 53

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Novel (Romance) | The University of Arkansas Press | 1997
Transcription MATRIMONIAL SPECULATIONS 53
forced him to come down and go with you and Miss Betsy to Blanton's,
he would a thousand times rather have gone with Sam Fuller on a bar
hunt. He says he's tired of these gatherings, and the foolish people who
git together thar. `But,' says I, `Mike, thar's some good, pleasant people
enough, and sensible, too, that goes to sich gatherings, and then he says:
`Yes, prehaps, of one could find them, without the trouble of hunting
them! It's like hunting a needle through a haystack. No!' says he, `if I'm
to hunt at all, let it be some animal that'll pay for the trouble and
expense of running it down and wasting powder and shot upon it."But,'
says I, `Mike, it's time for you to be thinking of gitting a wife! You ought
to be on the lookout now for a good one. You're gitting oldish; you're
twenty-eight, going on twenty-nine, and you're a burning daylight.
Before you knows whar you are, you'll be too gray for a green market!'
`Wife, indeed!' says he, `what do I want with a wife as long as I can find
game all through the mountains and make game of all that I find. I hev
thought, sometimes,' says he, `of doing the foolish thing like other
people; but I never yit could meet with a woman who had the right
sense to be company for a raal genooine man! They're all fuss fidget,
vanity and feathers!'
This was one of the favorite shots of Mattie Fuller herself whenever
Rose Carter was mentioned; and, under her frequent aggressive furore,
she did not hesitate to ascribe the shaft to her brother.
She had carried the attack into the enemy's country with a
vengeance. Her volubility, coolness, and dash were irresistible.
The stately lady was overwhelmed. Rose, herself, was somewhat con-
founded, and even Aunt Betsy knew not well what to believe.
For the time Mrs. Fuller silenced all her opponents, not pausing, by
any means, where we have done, but steadily pursuing her game
through all the sinuosities of the chase. It was only when she had fairly
silenced mother and daughter, and exhausted her own vocabulary, that
she came to a pause. She had, at least, proved to Mrs. Carter that short-
ness of breath was no longer her peculiar infirmity.
Rose retreated to her chamber in something of a huff!
The stately lady shut her eyes, leaned back in her cushioned fauteuil,
and, folding her hands in her lap, seemed to indicate a wish that the
colloquy should cease.
Seeing this, Aunt Betsy winked to her visitor, motioned with her
hand, nodded with her head, and succeeded in leading her forth from
the hall into the court in front of the dwelling, Mrs. Fuller leaving the
august presence with a triumphant toss of the head, and saying to her-
self as she went out: