Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Life of Francis Marion >> End Matter >> Advertisement

image of pageExplore Inside

Advertisement

Biography | Henry G. Langley | 1844
Transcription 6 HENRY G. LANGLEY'S PUBLICATIONS.
III.
THE DAUGHTERS OF ENGLAND,

THEIR POSITION IN SOCIETY, CHARACTER, AND RESPONSIBILITIES. PRICE 25 CENTS. .
" We have perused this honest and searching work with much satisfaction, and can confidently recommend it to every snottier who wishes her daughters to become really useful members of society ; and to every young female who has the wisdom to prefer esteem to admiration."—Christian Adv.

IV.
THE WOMEN OF ENGLAND,

THEIR SOCIAL DUTIES AND DOMESTIC HABITS.
PRICE 25 CENTS.
" We know no volume better calculated to exercise a powerful, lasting, and beneficial influence. If we could have our own way, every family should order a copy of ' The Women of England.' Husbands, especially young Husbands, should buy it for their Wives ; Fathers, for their Daughters ; Brothers, for their Sisters."—Jllethodist Magazine.

V.
THE POETRY OF LIFE,
In one volume, 8vo., 250 pages. Price 37 1/2 cents.

VI.
A VOICE FROM THE VINTAGE,

OR, FORCE OF EXAMPLE : ADDRESSED TO THOSE WHO THINK AND FEEL. PRICE 12 1/2 CENTS.

" We do not hesitate to pronounce this one of the best as well as one of the most useful, of Mrs. Ellis's highly popular works. Whatever she attempts is accomplished in a clear, vigorous and masterly manner—grappling her subject with a strength and grasp of mind truly astonishing to all, more especially to those who argue that depth of thought and wisdom are the attributes of the sterner sex only."—Washingtonian.

VII.
PICTURES OF PRIVATE LIFE,

FIRST AND SECOND SERIES. PRICE 25 CENTS EACH.
" This, we believe, was Mrs. Ellis's first work, and in some respects it is her best. It is a simple, truthful and touching delineation of the joys and sorrows, temptations, duties, and blessings of private domestic life, for the purpose of imparting useful instruction, and sound advice. The fiction is wrought with great interest and power, but is always subordinate to a high moral design, and is only assumed as a pleasing medium for the utterance of truths which would lose much of their impressiveness if proclaimed in a didactic form. There are few writers to whom a more cordial commendation can be given, by those who regard the interests of morality and religion, as well as the attractions of style and beauty of sentiment, than Mrs. Ellis."—Evangelist.