Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Letters of William Gilmore Simms. Vol. 6, Supplement >> 817a Lorenzo Sabine >> Page 328

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Correspondence | U of South Carolina P | 2012
Transcription 328 THE SIMMS LETTERS
it, as soon as I have made the desired extracts. With best wishes, such as the season seems to require I am dear sir, very truly

Yours etc.

W. Gilmore Simms.
ALS in South Caroliniana Library . Printed in Simms Review 5 (Winter 1997): 5-6.
817a : TO LORENZO SABINE

Charleston, Sep. 8, 1856 Lorenzo Sabine, Esq.
Dear Sir:
I cordially welcome your letter, which is written in the right spirit. There need be no quarrel between us, whatever the difference in opinion. You have your ways of thinking, I mine; yet we both, certainly, may aim at right objects, and feel equally all the just governing sentiments of a proper humanity. You assailed my country, as I thought, & still think, unjustly, and in a bad temper; and I defended her, as well as I could, according to my poor endowments. You err, however, in supposing that I held your book to be a bad one; if by this you mean a feeble & inefficient one.4' I neither thought nor said so. On the contrary, I held your introductory essay, which was the only portion upon which you could possibly lay yourself out, as a very vigorous & well written paper; ingeniously argued, in good style, and full of spirit and character. It was its tone & temper with which I found fault: its abuse of partial facts; and the evident purpose which it betrayed, rather to goad, sting, wound & disparage, than to be historically just & true. You see that I deal with you
43. Simms extensively criticized Sabine's The American Loyalists, or Biographical Sketches of Adherents to the British Crown in the War of the Revolution; Alphabetically Arranged; with a Preliminary Essay (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1847) in "South Carolina in the American Revolution," Southern Quarterly Review 14 (July 1848): 37—74 and "The Siege of Charleston in the American Revolution," Southern Quarterly Review 14 (October 1848): 261-377. He reprinted these two essays and a Southern Quarterly Review essay on John Pendleton Kennedy's novel Horse-shoe Robinson (1835) as South-Carolina in the Revolutionary War: Being a Reply to Certain Misrepresentations and Mistakes of Recent Writers, in Relation to the Course and Conduct of This State (Charleston, S.C.: Walker and James, 1853).