Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Simms Review (Vol 1: No 1) >> Bryant Visits Woodlands, 1843 >> Page 5

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Correspondence | 1850, 1856
Transcription The song of "Jenny gone away," webs also given, and
another, called the monkey-song, probably of African origin, in which the principal singer personated a monkey, with all sorts of odd gesticulations, and the other negroes bore part in the chorus, Dan, dan, who's de dandy ?" One of the
, in which the principal singer personated a monkey, with all sorts of odd gesticulations, and the other negroes bore part in the chorus, Dan, dan, who's de dandy ?" One of the
sorts of odd gesticulations, and the other negroes bore part in the chorus, Dan, dan, who's de dandy ?" One of the songs, commonly sung on these occasions, represents the
various animals of the woods as belonging to some profession or trade. For example

De cooter is do boatman--

The cooter is the terrapin, and a very expert boatman
he is.
De cooter is de boatman.
John John Crow.
De red-bird do sager.
John John Crow.
De mocking-bird de lawyer.
John John Crow.
De alligator sawyer.
John John Crow.

The alligator's back is furnished with a toothed ridge,
like the edge of a saw, which explains the last line.
When the work of the evening was over the negroes
adjourned to a spacious kitchen. One of them took his
plaec as musician, whistling, and beating time with two
sticks nun the floor. Several of the men came forward and
executed various dances, capering, prancing, and drumming
with heel and toe upon the floor, with astonishing agility
and perseverance, though all of then had performed their
daily tasks and had worked all the evening, and some had

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