Wlliam Gilmore Simms
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Scholarship | 2004
Transcription RECENT REVIEW

THOMAS ALLEN'S "SOUTH OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE" IS
AN ESSAY REVIEW OF RECENT UNIVERSITY PRESS EDITIONS OF
SIMMS. IT APPEARED IN AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY,
VOL. 16, NO. 3, 496-508.


EXCELLENT NEW BOOK ON TIMROD

Walter Brian Cisco has written an entertaining and engaging new biography of
Simms's friend and fellow poet Henry Timrod. The first complete and thoroughly
researched biography of Timrod, the volume came from F ixleigh Dickinson
University Press this summer and may now be ordered from Associated
University Presses, 2010 Eastpark Blvd., Cranbury, NJ. 08512, for $38.50. The
amount of original research Cisco has done here, coupled with the excellent prose,
makes this one of the better works of American literary history published in 2004.
The treatment of Simms will be of particular interest to Simms Society Members.
Here, Tinarod the man at last emerges from undeserved obscurity. Cisco captures
the passion of the poet and his time. We heartily recommend the work to Simms
students and are happy to announce that Mr. Cisco is our newest member of the.
Society. Cisco, a native of California, was educated at the University of South
Carolina, and now lives in Cordova, South Carolina.



ANOTHER SIMMS SOCIETY MEMBER WRITES NEW BOOK

Simms Society. Member Adam Tate of Stillman College in Alabama reprinted a
large portion of his Simms Review essay "Religion and the Good Society:
Simms's Classical View" (Vol. 9, Winter 2002) in his forthcoming Conservatism
and Southern Intellectuals, 1789 — 1861 (University of Missouri Press). We at the
Review are proud to have had a small part in it. Dr. Tate may be reached at P.O.
Drawer 1430, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35403.



POET PUBLISHES HISTORICAL WORK ON SIMMS

Poet and Simms Society Member Matthew Brennan of IndiaiState University has
published a poem, "After the Sack of South Carolina. William Gilmore Simms in
Exile. Columbia, March 1865," in the Sewanee Review (vol. 112, Winter 2004).

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