Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Simms Review (Vol 13: No 2) >> In Praise of Simms >> Page 40

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Page 40

Secondary Scholarship | [1860]
Transcription IN PRAISE OF SIMMS


Joseph Holt Ingraham (1809-1860) refers to Simms and the cultured
gentlemen of Charleston in his The Sunny South; Or, The Southerner at Home
(Philadelphia: George G. Evans, 1860), pp. 517-519. Ingraham, from Natchez
and Holly Springs, Mississippi, wrote this volume as a travelogue "to do justice
to the Southern planter," in contrast to such anti-Southern attacks as Frederick
Law Olmsted's propagandistic works.
Ingraham, one of the few writers in America to make a living from his
pen, published over a hundred novels during his short lifetime. His most
famous book, The Prince of the House of David (1857) had sold over three
million copies by the 1920s and is still in print. It was arguably the single best
selling book in the nineteenth century. While anti-Southern travel books are
easily available in print in various forms, The Sunny South is virtually unknown
and difficult to find. The copy I located for reprinting here had to be retrieved
from storage at the University of Georgia Library.


THE SUNNY SOUTH;

OR,

THE SOUTHERNER AT HOME,
EMBRACING.

FIVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE OF A NORTHERN GOVERNESS

IN THE

LAND OF THE SUGAR AND THE COTTON.
EDITED BY

PROFESSOR J. H. INGRAHAM,

OF MISSISSIPPI

" Stern winter smiles on that auspicious clime,
The fields are florid with untisding prince;
From the bleak pole no winds inclement blow,
Mold the round hail. or Hake the fleecy snow ;
But from the breezy deep the land inhales
The fragrant murmurs of the western gales."

PHILADELPHIA :
G. EVANS, PUBLISHER,
No. 439 CHESTNUT STREET.
1860.

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