Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Simms Review (Vol 13: No 2) >> Simms a Member of the S.C. Institute >> Page 46

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Scholarship | 1849
Transcription SIMMS A MEMBER OF THE S.C. INSTITUTE


In 1849, Charleston publisher Walker & James issued a pamphlet
containing James Henry Hammond's "Address Delivered Before the South-
Carolina Institute at Its First Annual Fair, on the 20th November, 1849."
At pages 51-55 , the pamphlet contains a members list of the Institute. Listed
there on page 52 is "W. G. Simms." He was one of 375 prominent
members from across the state, and had thus been so from the start. The
Institute's purpose was to further the well-being of South Carolina's
agricultural and industrial economy. The great building that housed the
Institute was on Meeting Street in Charleston. Burned during the great fire
of 1861, it was the site at which the Secession document was signed.



A NOTE ON ADAM L. TATE'S CONSERVATISM AND
SOUTHERN INTELLECTUALS 1789-1861: LIBERTY,
TRADITION, AND THE GOOD SOCIETY

Tate, Adam L. Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals 1789-1861:
Liberty, Tradition, and the Good Society. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri
Press, 2005.

Tate's survey of Southern conservatism during the antebellum period
highlights the thought of six influential figures of the period: John Taylor of
Caroline, John Randolph of Roanoke, Joseph Glover Baldwin, Johnson Jones.
Hooper, Nathaniel Beverley Tucker, and William Gilmore Simms and concludes
that Southern conservatism in the nineteenth century attempted a precarious
balancing act between individual freedom and the kind of social traditionalism
which would maintain societal order.
Early in his career, Tate writes, Simms supported the industrialization of
America as a means of inculcating civilization. Eventually, however, he came to
see the attendant avarice spawned by industrialization as too high a price and
became a stalwart of the Agrarian way of life. For Simms, an independent
Southern nation was the only means for maintaining those American values and
traditions that had sustained the Republic following its liberation from England
Elsewhere, these imponderables had been gobbled up by indiscriminate money-
grubbing. His many novels and stories, particularly those of the Revolutionary
cycle, most notably Woodcraft, are efforts to preserve and to disseminate those
values
Tate's historicallintellectual/literary survey performs a valuable service bE
bringing to light the work of writers, statesmen, and jurists who have been too
often ignored. Randall K. Ivey
University of South Carolina, Union, SC
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