Wlliam Gilmore Simms
The Simms Review (Vol 16: No 1) >> A List of New Simms Poems >> Page 21

image of pageExplore Inside

Page 21

Secondary Scholarship | 2008
Transcription The two poems that now must be removed from the listing in The
Poetry of William Gilmore Simms are:

1. [Untitled.] "Jackson is dead!" cries noisy fame
Southern Literary Gazette, I (December 1828), 220. In an unidentified printed
version pasted in Simms's Scrapbook D, in the Simms Manuscript Collection
at the South Caroliniana Library, it is signed "Mr. Simms." Simms Letters, VI,
p. 179, relates that this is by Simms's father, William Gilmore Simms, Sr. The
son no doubt was responsible for publishing it in the SLG.

2. "The Rifleman's Fancy Shot.""Riffleman, shobt me a fancy
shot["]
Although it appeared in Father A. J. Ryan's Banner of the South, III (2 April
1870), under Simms's name, Father Ryan likely mistakenly. took it to be by
Simms, probably because it was published unsign in Simms's edition The War
Poetry of the South (1866), 132-133. Simms did not list it among his war
poems in "Printed Poetry Box," P 1540, Simms Manuscripts Collection, South
Caroliniana Library, Univ of SC. The poem was likely by Charles Dawson
Shanly.
--------------------------


At least four notable poems known to be by Simms and not yet located
are:

1. "The Ring: A Tale of Italy in Four Cantos." The narrative
poem is described by Simms in his Letters, II, 221.

2. " The Millenium of a People." Listed by Simms on his list of war
poems in "Printed Poetry Box," P 1540, Simms Manuscript Collection, South
Caroliniana Library, Univ of SC. Diligent searches of both the Charleston
Courier and Mercury have not turned it up.

3. "The .Grave of Marion." On the rear pasted end paper of
Simms's Scrapbook A, Simms Manuscript Collection, South Caroliniana
Library, Univ of SC, Simms listed titles of seventeen of his poems. All but
"The Grave of Marion" have been located and are recorded in Kibler, The
Poetry of William Gilmore Simms. See Simms Review, II, no. 2 (Winter 1994),
24.
4. "Oh! Strike the Lute Lady." In Charleston Courier (6 June
1842), the editor notes that the lyrics of Number 10 of the Songs of the South
Series is by Simms, with music by Francis Kinloch of Charleston. See also
Courier (11 June 1842).
21